Medicines and prescribing

Show sub-pages

Prescribing efficiency

Forecasting General Practice prescribing spend

The NHS Business Services Authority publishes a monthly 'Prescribing Monitoring Document' for for every Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) that shows the amount that each practice in that CCG is forecast to spend on prescribing each financial year.

We edit the Bristol PMD and publish it here. The forecast spend is calculated using this formula on the Business Services Authority website.

This is shown alongside the practice prescribing budget, which is an indicative budget that NHS Bristol CCG sets each year (see below).

We also include a guide to the share of overall spend that the current prescribing needs formula used by NHS England expects to be attributed to each practice. This can then be compared to the actual share of the spend attributed to each practice.

The document shows what the forecast spend would be per ASTRO PU. An ASTRO PU is a measure based on practice population that is weighted according to age, sex, and temporary resident status.

It also includes the Index of Multiple Deprivation (IMD). This calculates deprivation from parameters chosen to cover a range of economic, social and housing issues into a single deprivation score, and can be calculated at practice level.

The data is collated by the NHS Business Services Authority, based on their payments to community pharmacies and is always two months in arrears due to the time taken to process prescriptions.

You can access Prescribing Monitoring Documents (PMD) on the BNSSG Joint Formulary website and below.

Indicative prescribing budgets 2017/18

Other measures of efficiency

We also publish data on four other areas where we would like practices to investigate whether prescribing could be more cost effective:

1. Prescribing catalogue

Please review the prescribing catalogue and investigate any unusual prescribing and review whether it is appropriate.

2. Unlicensed special order products

These unlicensed medicines are not tested for safety and efficacy like normal licensed medicines and also have no price set by the NHS and are therefore often disproportionately expensive.

3. Individual prescription items costing more than £250

These have the greatest potential for the largest efficiency savings per item.

4. Generic prescribing

This shows how practices can save money by prescribing drugs generically, rather than by brand.

The data is collated by the NHS Business Services Authority, based on their payments to community pharmacies and is always two months in arrears due to the time taken to process prescriptions.